J. S. NEWMAN AND JAB. CLAYTON.

Eighteen thoroughbred varieties of corn were planted, in plots, upon land practically uniform in productiveness. Four hundred pounds of cotton seed meal were broadcasted, per acre, before breaking the land. After breaking thoroughly with Stark Dixie turn plows, furrows were opened with shovel plow four feet apart. In these, 2,000 pounds of compost (of cotton seed, stable manure and acid phosphate mixed by the “corn formula,” viz: 500 pounds acid phosphate and 750 pounds each of cotton seed and stable manure, per acre,) were applied and mixed with the soil by one “bull tongue” furrow. the corn was then dropped every two feet in the drill. This¬†gave eight square feet to each hill of corn. Upon half of the
space occupied by each variety two stalks were left to each hill and one stalk on the other half